cecileemeke:

We are launching a cowdfunding & donation campaign for both Ackee & Saltfish The Web Series and The Strolling Series.

If everyone who watched the trailer to Ackee & Saltfish donated just £1 we could raise over £20,000.

You can find out exactly how your money will help us at » http://donate.cecileemeke.com «

Essentially it comes down to this, it is already hard to get funding as an artist, period, but when you are trying to get funding for projects that are uncompromisingly by and about black people, it’s extremely difficult.

If everyone who watched Abraham’s episode from the strolling series donated just £1 we could raise way over £15,000.

We want to take strolling everywhere from Paris, to Kampala, to Brooklyn, but we need support to make that a reality. Similarly, we want to make The Web Series Ackee & Saltifsh of the highest quality and we need support for that. Also our actors work for free. We all moan about people selling out and doing shitty roles but these are professional actors and they need to eat and pay rent so support them!

"The place in which I’ll fit will not exist until I make it." - James Baldwin

We are making it. Help us to continue to make dope art, for dope people

DONATE: http://donate.cecileemeke.com

TWITTER: @cecileemeke

Women in Clothes - featuring Us!

We still can’t believe we’re a part of this great project, but, you guys, here we are. We learned so much about each other while working on this and are pretty amazed by how similar our experiences were - whether the topic be hair, influences, or perspectives. Most important, we had a lot of fun doing it. Below are a few excerpts from our style roundtable (which you can listen to here) as well as our personal style surveys (which you can read here, here, and here). Please check them out and feel free to share your own style outlooks and journeys with us!

Fatima:

On the street I especially love spotting really stylish older women. It’s so soul-crushingly difficult to just be who you want to be as a woman without the world telling you otherwise, so if you’ve managed to survive all that and come out the other side a badass elderly lady, I take my hat off to you. Maya Angelou talked about not just surviving, but thriving and the importance of that and I couldn’t agree more. Especially as a Black woman. You made it! Despite it all, you’re still here! There should be some celebration in that. I joke with my friends that I view stylish old women as my peers. I can’t wait to be one of them!

Ramou:

I really don’t understand people who say that they don’t care how they look or present. Or maybe I just don’t believe them. It’s also a privilege to feel this way since we are so often judged not only on first appearances, but on the perceived thoughts about us based on how we look. There’s too much stereotypical and racist nonsense projected on black women for me to fuck it up on my own by looking a mess. Maybe that’s fucked up in its own way. (It is.) It’s important to me — how I look and feel and how these two things are related — because I’m in my body everyday and out in the world most days. Feeling good about being in my body, looking the way I look, wearing what I’m wearing, sets the tone for so much else.

Aurelia:

I want to insinuate myself in somebody’s life, no matter how I look. A stranger doesn’t even have to speak to me - I just need to know that I look good enough that you are now thinking about me. Like, you’ve fallen in love with me a little bit. You’re maybe not creepy enough to write a Missed Connections, but you thought about it for a second.

Alesia:

I like complimenting other black women - women of color - in general because I feel like a lot of times the only people giving us compliments are other women of color. It’s not a conscious thing where I’m like, “I’m going to go in here and find the two black girls and load them down with compliments.” It’s just something I tend to do because I realize, “Look, I see what you’re doing over there, I see what you’re working with, and I like it.” You can find more info on this project at the official Women in Clothes website and here on tumblr ( womeninclothes).

xoxoxo,

BGT

“Do any of you feel some type of way like I do about the new show on Lifetime "Girlfriend Intervention". Where 4 black women (1 of whom is Tanisha from BGC) take a white woman and make her over and give her confindence...but repeatedly refer to her as a sister, and try to "release her inner black girl"”

I (Fatima) am the only one who watched it, because I clearly have no self respect or standards, and I talk a little bit about how awful it is in our next episode.

shedwellswithbeauty:

"She dwells with Beauty—Beauty that must die" - John Keats
I finally made a thing and put it up on Issuu: She Dwells With Beauty. Please click through to read. I’m considering doing a limited printing if there’s enough interest (and people wouldn’t mind parting with a few bucks for shipping, printing.)
I dedicate this to @vivian-fu and shutl0w who listened to me ramble last year about wanting to make a zine.  Also dylancaderao who has always wanted me to put something together.
Thank you for taking any time at all to read this even if you just ctrl+w or scroll by. 
I’d appreciate any and all comments.
ZoomInfo
shedwellswithbeauty:

"She dwells with Beauty—Beauty that must die" - John Keats
I finally made a thing and put it up on Issuu: She Dwells With Beauty. Please click through to read. I’m considering doing a limited printing if there’s enough interest (and people wouldn’t mind parting with a few bucks for shipping, printing.)
I dedicate this to @vivian-fu and shutl0w who listened to me ramble last year about wanting to make a zine.  Also dylancaderao who has always wanted me to put something together.
Thank you for taking any time at all to read this even if you just ctrl+w or scroll by. 
I’d appreciate any and all comments.
ZoomInfo

shedwellswithbeauty:

"She dwells with Beauty—Beauty that must die" - John Keats

I finally made a thing and put it up on Issuu: She Dwells With Beauty. Please click through to read. I’m considering doing a limited printing if there’s enough interest (and people wouldn’t mind parting with a few bucks for shipping, printing.)

I dedicate this to @vivian-fu and shutl0w who listened to me ramble last year about wanting to make a zine.  Also dylancaderao who has always wanted me to put something together.

Thank you for taking any time at all to read this even if you just ctrl+w or scroll by. 

I’d appreciate any and all comments.


 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.
ZoomInfo

 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.
ZoomInfo

 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.
ZoomInfo

 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.
ZoomInfo

 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.

Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.

madeinthedark:

Official Trailer - Girlhood (Bande de filles)

Directed by Céline Sciamma. Starring Karidja Toure, Assa Sylla, Lindsay Karamoh, and Marietou Toure.

I am a big of Céline Sciamma’s work and this looks excellent. It’s has already been getting great reviews. One can be read here. I spend a lot of time wishing for movies like this to get made. So I get excited every now and then when a film featuring black characters especially black female characters being shown as people with real lives makes an appearance. Absolutely can’t wait for a stateside release. In the meantime check out Sciamma’s other work which is readily available on Netflix.

(via Shadow & Act )