We Need To Talk About Jen Selter4

The first time I heard about this Vanity Fair issue my eyes rolled so far back into my head that I still haven’t recovered, and friend of the podcast, Kara Brown hits every note here explaining just why that is. 

- Fatima

onedirectionfacingmecca:

Your ex-husband, the rapper Nas, put your wedding dress on his album cover. Why did he still have the dress? It’s not even the dress. The joke behind that is that it’s the slip to the petticoat to my dress. I think when I moved out I just left it. That’s all he had, poor thing.Did you know that was coming? He gave me a heads-up like two days before it was released.Do you know why? All kinds of ideas of why, but I don’t really care.But it brought up a bunch of stuff you were probably hoping was in the past. Maybe for others, but not for me. I don’t really listen to his music anyway.

Kelis, New York Times 

Kelis’ levels of “don’t come for me unless I send for you” are truly inspirational. 2014 is shaping up to be “Black Women: The Year of The Clapback” and I love it. Go on and read the rest of the interview while streaming Kelis’ new album “Food" - and when you’re done revisit some Kelis Klassics.

- Alesia

onedirectionfacingmecca:

Your ex-husband, the rapper Nas, put your wedding dress on his album cover. Why did he still have the dress?
It’s not even the dress. The joke behind that is that it’s the slip to the petticoat to my dress. I think when I moved out I just left it. That’s all he had, poor thing.

Did you know that was coming?
He gave me a heads-up like two days before it was released.

Do you know why?
All kinds of ideas of why, but I don’t really care.

But it brought up a bunch of stuff you were probably hoping was in the past.
Maybe for others, but not for me. I don’t really listen to his music anyway.

Kelis, New York Times

Kelis’ levels of “don’t come for me unless I send for you” are truly inspirational. 2014 is shaping up to be “Black Women: The Year of The Clapback” and I love it. Go on and read the rest of the interview while streaming Kelis’ new album “Food" - and when you’re done revisit some Kelis Klassics.

- Alesia

Laverne Cox accepting the Stephen F. Kolzak award at the GLAAD Media Awards April 4th, 2014.

#1, when Laverne Cox cries, I cry, that is just a fact of life like birds chirping and whales having blow holes. Laverne has made me shed a tear for many reasons, not just because her hair is laid so perfectly, or her eyebrows are just so, or that she’s so smart and so brave with what seems to be the biggest heart this side of the hemisphere. But like they say in church (it is almost Easter, after all)…Sister Laverne shows up. She shows up for people who are so often ignored and looked over in the larger society. First and foremost trans women of color and QPOC. She is fully using her Black girl magic to support and lift up other Black girls, and she is an absolute Possibility Model™ for all of us to do the same on all fronts. 

"[I] want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and for each other." ~Laverne Cox

Let us love, listen to, and liberate each other. Sound good? 

~Aurelia 

papermagazine:

Naomi Campbell, photographed by Edward Maxey for Paper, November 1990. From “Invisible Beauty: The Legendary Fashion Guru Bethann Hardison Explains Why Models All Look The Same These Days. .”

Before Naomi made diversity in fashion her mission (and thank goodness she did!), Bethann Hardison created The Black Girls Coalition which aimed to do the same. Here’s a short interview with Hardison about the importance of representation and the underlying racism behind designers solely using white models as an “aesthetic” choice. - Alesia

papermagazine:

Naomi Campbell, photographed by Edward Maxey for Paper, November 1990. From “Invisible Beauty: The Legendary Fashion Guru Bethann Hardison Explains Why Models All Look The Same These Days. .”

Before Naomi made diversity in fashion her mission (and thank goodness she did!), Bethann Hardison created The Black Girls Coalition which aimed to do the same. Here’s a short interview with Hardison about the importance of representation and the underlying racism behind designers solely using white models as an “aesthetic” choice.

- Alesia

NBC asks viewers for better sitcom ideas | EW.com4

We’ve talked about the very white, bro-centric world of TV comedy before, so this is (maybe) good news for those who fall outside of that realm, and don’t necessarily have access to the more traditional paths to professional comedy production. We say it all the time: we need new voices for PoC content as well as the opportunities for production of that content. Hopefully this opens the doors for some new and interesting stuff to happen outside of the innovative work coming out of the world of web series. 

- Fatima